Corriedale Fleece from Hubbard Handspun

As you know, I purchased a Corriedale fleece from Hubbard Handspun. It arrived in a Home Depot box with some adorable postage stickers. Somehow this made me nervous: this, this was going to be a beautiful fleece. Was I ready?

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I peeked in the box on arrival day, just because I couldn’t help myself and the sheepy goodness wafted out of the cardboard and plastic. I pulled out a lock, snapped it by my ear (heard a lovely ‘ping’), looked it over and my, oh my, this fleece! Well, you’ll see what I mean in a moment. Like you, I had to wait another day before I could unfurl this beauty and see about the 7lbs of happiness–yes, I weighed it on the bathroom scale in the meantime.

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Today, I laid out the fleece sheet on the kitchen floor and we slid the whole thing out of its plastic wrapper. It was a huge ball of sheep, and so very clean and white already.

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I had hoped to go all expert on the thing and roll it out into a “sheep shape,” but I managed to unroll it the wrong way–tip side down (doh!). But, it was still wonderful and SO BIG! so much fleece: a bit of an overwhelming moment, to be honest. Luckily, S was here and he suggested we get right to it. That, and a little voice from my guild-mate B, convinced me to dive in. There was no wrong way to do this. And, as sad as I was to break up the fleece party, there was so much satisfaction in the disassembly, which took us about 1.5 hours.

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I was waiting to find something unsavory, or even just some second cuts, or some fluff, but no; this fleece was just about as perfect as could be. At every turn another excellent hunk of locks just rolled right out and into the box.

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We decided on the following method: keep the locks as intact as possible and sort by length, matting/dirt level, and fluff. There was very little fluff (or fiber that was already in picked/cloud form); there were tons of perfect locks. These went marching into the box and the fluff went into the tub. I found exactly 2 handfuls of locks that were even remotely “dirty”; the rest was pristine.

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Because the fleece is SO CLEAN, I debated whether to just spin in the grease–and, indeed, took a couple of locks for a test spin. It would be lovely to spin it just as it is, but I think in the interest of keeping moths away while I spin this slowly over the next month, I will wash it up tomorrow or over the weekend. Plus, that will keep my wheel and carders cleaner, and my bucket method will keep the locks intact so that I can just flick and spin from the fold as I go. Here are some parting shots of the fleece all ready for processing. Time to roll that out that DIY drying rack again!

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If I had to buy just one fleece a year, I think it would be worth it to purchase one just like this–so fine, beautiful, easy to spin, and lovely to work with.

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This entry was posted in breed, Corriedale, farm, fiber, fleece, raw wool, technique. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Corriedale Fleece from Hubbard Handspun

  1. Pingback: Statuesque | Knitting the Stash!

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