Border Leicester Lincoln Teeswater Part 1

If that isn’t a mouthful, I’m not sure what is! When I picked up my new-used wheel, the previous owner offered some fiber . . . I had no idea what that meant. But it turned out that she had a wool barn full of fleece from this season (and maybe from even longer ago). She invited me in (whoa!) and I had the pick of the fleece.I chose this one for a few reasons: it’s from this season, looked cleaner and dryer, and had a lovely deep black/chocolate color.

I didn’t have my scale with me, so I’m not sure how much it weighed, but it felt like 10-12lbs. It still needed to be skirted; this made me a bit nervous, because it’s always best to skirt before storing your fleece, but I turned it out on a tarp outside yesterday and things look OK. In fact, my family thought I had bagged a massive black bear! I aggressively skirted it and separated out the sections that had the least VM. I ended up with 3-bags full; two are worth cleaning and the third might be a candidate for the fermented suint method . . . I’ll have to let you know.

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The VM is pretty heavy in the middle, but around the other sections, it’s not so bad–especially for a free fleece.

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As for the breed mix: it’s an interesting one, for sure. Mostly long wools, but the staple length is not that long. I’m very curious how it will clean up–and whether I need to comb it instead of carding it. I’ll report back!

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This entry was posted in breed, fleece, longwool, skirting, technique. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Border Leicester Lincoln Teeswater Part 1

  1. BeeJeweled says:

    That is a huge fleece! Those large pieces of straw are sometimes easier to get out than the small ones. Wash it first, and then you will see how much falls out during the carding, combing. It seems that fleeces have a way of finding you!

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  2. buggleboo says:

    I wish I would have known this method of washing wool a few years ago– I also was given a free fleece, but didn’t know what I was doing and made a mess of it. I think I ended up salvaging about 1/4 of the wool and even that was pretty sad looking by the time I finished.

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    • lissymail says:

      Oh yes, I have been fascinated by this washing method too! I have yet to try it tho, you will have to let me know if you go for it!

      Like

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